Meet our Grant and Award Makers

For 45 years, Seeding Justice has shifted decision-making power through a participatory grantmaking model that ensures the people most impacted by injustice are the ones centered. Our grantmakers and award committee members are activists, organizers, and community members who are on the frontlines working to dismantle oppressive systems.

Chris smiles at the camera with her fist under her chin wearing glasses and a metallic silver ring.

Chris Baker | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Chris Baker | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Outside of her policy and advocacy work at Hunger-Free Oregon, Chris also acts as the Administrator to the Oregon Hunger Task Force, and co-facilitator for Hunger-Free Oregon’s SNAP Client Advisory Board. She holds two degrees in Gender, Race, and Nations with emphasis on Community Health Equity from Portland State University. Chris has 10 years of lived experience with situational poverty and food insecurity and is dedicated to surrounding herself in work that supports grassroots social change, women’s empowerment and advocacy, and policy changes that reduce racial, social, and gendered disparities. Outside of work, Chris lives in the suburbs of Portland with her two grown boys, an absurd amount of houseplants, and her two dogs – all of which are the center of her universe.

Olivia Bormann wears bright red lipstick and a royal blue shirt smiling at the camera.

Olivia Bormann | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Olivia Bormann | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Olivia (she/her) identifies as a queer, biracial Black survivor and is passionate about identifying oppressive and inequitable structures and coming up with transformative solutions. She currently works as a domestic violence advocate and provides holistic support to BIPOC, international, and LGBTQ+ students in Portland State University’s School of Business. She worked in higher education fundraising for 7 years, done community organizing and workplace organizing, and consults with organizations to advance equity for minoritized folks. Olivia holds a master’s in higher education and student affairs and is a master’s in social work candidate at PSU.

Olivia has lived in Portland with her partner since 2019. Prior to living in Oregon, Olivia attended college and lived in the Bay Area for 8 years. In her free time, she loves to cook and eat, sing at the top of her lungs, and soak up every minute of sunshine she can.

Camerina smiles at the camera wearing dark rimmed glasses and a red collared shirt.

Camerina Galván | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Camerina Galván | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Camerina is a bi+ small business owner. Her people are from Cuautla, Jalisco, México and she comes from a long line of artisans and farmers. She believes her soul’s purpose is to actuate conditions for social change and our collective liberation. She does this by amplifying the work of BIPOC small business owners and BIPOC-led organizations doing anti-oppression work, being committed to her own healing and decolonization, and learning to be an anti-capitalist entrepreneur.

Ubaldo Hernandez stands amongst a crowd of protestors wearing a green and beige beanie.

Ubaldo Hernández | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / Ese

Ubaldo Hernández | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / Ese

Ubaldo works as a community organizer with Columbia Riverkeeper in Hood River, conducting community outreach on clean water while promoting equity, inclusion, and diversity. Ubaldo has been an active member in the Latinx community in the Columbia Gorge, participating in projects that promote awareness on issues that are relevant to Latinxs in Oregon and Washington. In the last 15 years, he has launched and participated in multiple projects benefiting the Latinx community, including the local community radio station Radio Tierra. In his free time, he enjoys mountain biking, fishing, and hiking in the Columbia Gorge.

Ana Molina wears a dusty rose colored shirt and a backpack while smiling out in the field.

Ana Molina | Board Member, General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Ana Molina | Board Member, General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Ana Molina joined Seeding Justice’s Board in April 2019, having worked through the Seeding Justice Capacity Building Initiative as part of Beyond Toxics. She is now the Movement Building Manager for Columbia Riverkeeper where she advocates for environmental and climate justice, ensuring the voices of the people most impacted are at the forefront and leading our conversations.

Ana lives in Eugene but grew up in South Lake Tahoe, California. Ana moved to Oregon after she graduated from Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA where she was involved with student organizing with and for undocumented students on campus and in the community. Ana has a love for both the environment and people because we are resilient, strong and imaginative, and we can come up with solutions when we work collectively centering our communities. On her downtime Ana likes to hike, backpack, read, and check out thrift stores.

Bruce Morris wears a brown, striped beanie and sunglasses while smiling.

Bruce Morris | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / His

Bruce Morris | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / His

Bruce has worked for the Central Oregon community and social justice groups as an organizer, executive, and developer since 2002. He has served as Executive Director for Human Dignity Coalition, coordinator at the Central Oregon Social Justice Center, and currently as Executive Director at KPOV in Bend. He has a law degree and practiced law for many years. After 15 years as a corporate attorney, the injustice he was facilitating became unbearable. He decided to devote his life to working for justice and supporting the inspiring people who have dedicated their careers to furthering community.

Damon Motz-Storey, wearing a floral print shirt, smiles into the camera.

Damon Motz-Storey | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: They / Them / Theirs

Damon Motz-Storey | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: They / Them / Theirs
Damon Motz-Storey is a white, nonbinary queer artist, community organizer, and communications professional living on stolen land in Northeast Portland. They spent five years organizing to stop fossil fuel projects and advance climate justice policies with Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and currently serve as Communications and Development Manager for the Coalition of Communities of Color. Damon’s ancestors include Danish holocaust resistors, Midwest anti-segregationist preachers, Quaker migration justice advocates, and also white settlers who received stolen land in the 19th-century Homestead Act — all of this drives Damon to seek ways to disrupt white supremacy, redistribute inherited wealth, and move towards decolonization. Damon grew up in the Rocky Mountains, received their B.S. in mathematics from Haverford College near Philadelphia, and spent many childhood winters traveling overseas. They enjoy singing, riding their bicycle, exploring the outdoors, and performing in drag.
Makerusa Porotesano wears a sky blue hawaiian shirt and a white floral lei.

Makerusa Porotesano | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / His

Makerusa Porotesano | General Fund Grantmaker

Pronouns: He / Him / His

Makerusa grew up in Portland by way of St. Johns, North Portland. He has been student organizing since early in his college days. He is the founder of the Pacific Islander Student Alliance (PISA), which started in 2007 when he was an undergraduate student. He is also the founding coordinator of the Men of Color Leadership Program at Portland Community College, and before that, he was the coordinator of the Pacific Islander, Asian and Asian American (PIAAA) Student Center at Portland State University, the Manager of Continuing Education at the University of the South Pacific, Majuro Campus, and the Director of the Office of Student Activities and Leadership at Chaminade University.

Makerusa is a second-generation American Samoan from the village of Fogagogo. Mak started his college education at American Samoa Community College. He later received his BS from Portland State University, and a Master’s in Education from Chaminade University of Honolulu. Away from his day job, Mak is an organizer with the Pacific Climate Warriors of 350 Pacific, and is Chair of the Samoa Pacific Development Corporation, a 501(c)(3) organization for Samoans in Oregon.

Davis Esther Rose wears a rainbow colored long sleeve shirt under black overalls adorned with pins. They're smiling into the camera with blue hair in front of a grove of trees.

Davis Esther Rose | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: They / Them / Theirs

Davis Esther Rose | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: They / Them / Theirs

Davis is a 22-year-old queer femme who likes to put noses on their colon smiley faces :-). Interested in art and design for most of their life, Davis is currently a graphic designer with radical youth collective Marrow PDX. They are bringing a solid commitment to social and gender justice, a desire to learn about activist-led grantmaking, and a “strong Jewish voice” to Seeding Justice’s grantmaking committee.

Alessandra de la Torre poses in a red dress and a dark-colored shawl in a purple-ish light.

Alessandra de la Torre | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Alessandra de la Torre | General Fund and Rapid Response Grantmaker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Alessandra de la Torre works at Rogue Climate in Southern Oregon. Born and raised in the Bay Area, her goal is to increase diverse representation and education in Southern Oregon, while intersecting social and environmental movements. Alessandra is a proud Xicana from immigrant parents and a first-generation high school and college graduate. She believes our shared liberation is of upmost importance and it can happen through political advocacy, civic engagement, grassroots organizing, and community healing.

Intisar Abioto is caught mid-performance, arms raised in the air and her hair flowing wildly behind her.

Intisar Abioto | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / They

Intisar Abioto | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / They

Intisar Abioto (b. Memphis, TN. 1986) is a movement artist working across photography, dance, and writing. Moving from the visionary and embodied root of Blackgirl Southern cross-temporal cross-modal storytelling ways, her works refer to the living breath/breadth of people of African descent against the expanse of their storied, geographic, and imaginative landscapes. ​Working in long-form projects that encompass the visual, folkloric, documentary, and performing arts, she has produced ​The People Could Fly Project​, ​The Black Portlanders​, and ​The Black​. Abioto’s publication ​Black Portlands ​documents interviews with Black Portlanders alongside her photographs. ​She was a contributing photographer to ​MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora​ (2017) and her photographs illustrated the Urban League of Portland’s ​State of Black Oregon 2015​. Alongside the five women artists in her family, she is the co-founder of Studio Abioto, a multivalent creative arts studio. ​She lives in Portland, Oregon.

RaShaunda Brooks, wearing a gray fedora and a black t-shirt, poses with her hand under her chin.

RaShaunda Brooks | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

RaShaunda Brooks | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

RaShaunda Brooks is a filmmaker and artist based in Portland, OR who creates modern day narratives of Black and Brown people to accurately reflect the truths in their communities. She believes that the more complex, well-rounded stories of Black and Brown people out there, the more these communities are empowered to also write their own histories and experiences. Brooks believes when people aren’t given room to express themselves, it breeds chaos and/or stagnation, but personal expression takes time to cultivate. When Black and Brown people are focused on survival, real creative expression cannot be prioritized, cannot thrive. She organizes under Y.G.B. (Young Gifted and Black / Brown) Portland, is a project coordinator for Open Signal Labs: Black Film fellowship and manages local duo Brown Calculus. These rich connections provide Brooks the room to hold stories of people who often don’t get represented right now in dominant white narrative; to share the lives of those who look like her.

Taiko artist Michelle Fujii sits cross-legged on the floor with her arms raised.

Michelle Fujii | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

She / Her / Hers

Michelle Fujii | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

She / Her / Hers

Michelle Fujii is a taiko artist, co-director of Unit Souzou, and educator, creating contemporary work centered in the art forms of taiko and Japanese folk dance. Michelle’s work navigates the multifaceted complexity of identity in our communities, a constant excavation to claim their own identity story. After graduating with a UCLA ethnomusicology degree, Michelle studied in Japan with foremost theatrical folk dance company, Warabi-za through a Japanese Bunkacho fellowship. Michelle has been a guest artist and collaborator with numerous North American and international taiko groups. In 2014, Michelle with her partner Toru Watanabe, fused their unique skills to build Unit Souzou, a Portland-based taiko ensemble creating an expressive blend of taiko and Japanese folk dance, forging new traditions for evolving communities.

She serves on the board of Arts Northwest, Artist Advisory Council of Dance Place, and is the Co-chair of Women & Taiko, a movement dedicated to make visible the contributions of womxn taiko leaders. Michelle has been awarded fellowships from the Oregon Arts Commission and the Jubilation Foundation. Her newest work, Constant State of Otherness, is a National Performance Network, MAPFund, and New England Foundation for the Arts funded project, which centers on the historical and divisive ways that othering has pervasively and insidiously affected our communities.

Marilyn Keller wears a bright, multi-colored top and a necklace while holding her head in her right hand under the chin.

Marilyn Keller | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Gentlebeing

Marilyn Keller | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Gentlebeing

Marilyn T. Keller is a 2016 Jazz Society of Oregon Hall of Fame Inductee. A 38-year veteran of music and stage performance in Jazz, Gospel, R&B, Pop, Blues, and theater, nationally and internationally, her musical roots are diverse. Marilyn has built a career that has taken her as a feature artist to Denmark, Sweden, Norway, The Netherlands, Spain, Australia, Russia and the UK for concerts, festivals, nightclubs and recording work. Her voice can be heard on multiple recordings, movie soundtracks, commercials and documentaries. Marilyn’s formative jazz training was as a member of the Mt. Hood Community College Vocal Jazz Ensemble and as the vocalist fronting the award-winning MHCC Jazz Lab Band. She can be seen frequently at clubs, restaurants, festivals and holiday events throughout the Pacific Northwest. She remains active, performing with Don Latarski, Darrell Grant, Tom Grant, Black Swan Classic Jazz Band, Pressure Point Band and the Augustana Jazz Quartet, among many others.

Dawn Redstone Jones, who has short black hair, poses in a black shirt.

Dawn Jones Redstone | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Dawn Jones Redstone | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: She / Her / Hers

Dawn Jones Redstone is an award-winning queer, Latinx writer/director whose films have screened around the globe. Her work often features women and people of color and explores themes of emotionality, feminism and the internal machinations that help us transform into the people we want to become. She’s a former recipient of Seeding Justice’s  Lilla Jewel Artist Award, was named Woman of Vision by Oregon Daily Journal of Commerce, and has been awarded four grants from the Regional Arts and Culture Council to date. In addition to a commitment to having inclusive sets, she believes in using her hiring decisions to lift people up and help create a filmmaking community that reflects the world we live in. Before becoming a full-time filmmaker, Dawn worked as a union carpenter and as training manager at Oregon Tradeswomen for a combined total of 15 years. She resides with her wife and daughter in Portland, Oregon.

Silver grins wearing a light gray turtleneck and printed fedora in front of a wooden lattice fence.

Silver | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: They / Them

Silver | Lilla Jewel Award Maker

Pronouns: They / Them

Silver (he/they) is an AfroIndigenous, Non-binary Creative Polymath: an Interdisciplinary Artist, Visionary, and Advocate. Silver’s work is a means to explore self-expression, sovereignty, and mysticism. His creative process is rooted in the academy and his dynamic life experience. In 2020, Silver was featured via National Geographic, Willamette Week, and Oregon Public Broadcasting for their efforts in the Movement for Black Lives. Further, they were the 2017 Lilla Jewel Award winner of Oregon’s Seeding Justice. His work has also been featured in the San Diego Union Tribune, on The Today Show, and on KUSI news. From San Diego, CA, Silver has lived in Portland, OR since 2015. Visit Patreon.com/SilverChalice to become an exclusive Art Patron!